Information Privacy Courses

Technology for Lawyers

LAW 799 (1 hour)

Course Description: Sometimes it takes more than knowledge of the law to understand how to advise a client. This course aims to introduce the necessary technical basics of computing and the Internet. If you use a computer everyday but don't understand how it works or how it communicates over networks, this course will fill in the gaps and explain how it all works and why. The course is designed to prepare students and lawyers for dealing with specific areas of the law (such as information privacy, cyber security, computer crimes, and intellectual property) that frequently require an ability to understand basic information technology concepts and often involve communicating with technology-savvy clients.

Advanced Privacy in Practice

LAW 786 (2 or 3 hours)

Course Description: This course will provide students with practical exposure to data privacy, security and management issues that arise within the enterprise. It will offer problem-based exercises that track the subjects explored in the Global Privacy Law course, will more deeply explore specialized areas of privacy law (e.g. health, financial, educational, and personal information), and will address legal responses to data breach. Example problems include drafting a privacy policy for a consumer-based website, addressing a board of directors about the importance of data security, or preparing congressional testimony about proposed privacy legislation. The final grade will be based upon an exam. Students may elect to write a paper (in addition to the exam) for an additional one credit.

Information Privacy Law

LAW 777 (3 hours)

Course Description: This course is an introduction to privacy law. The course will place privacy within a social and legal context and will investigate the complex mesh of legal structures and institutions that govern privacy at state, national, and international levels. Students will be taught how to critically analyze privacy problems and make observations about sources of law and their interpretation. Students will be provided with the technological details needed to explore information security and management issues. The 3 credit "Information Privacy Law" course will also include students taking the 1 credit "Foundations in Privacy Law" bridge course for the first third of the semester.

Global Privacy Law

LAW 725 (2 or 3 hours)

Course Description: Personal data have become the raw material for business models in industries ranging from online advertising, social networking, cloud computing, health and financial services. Governments, too, rely on personal data for purposes such as national security and law enforcement, urban planning and traffic control, public health and education. Emerging technologies greatly enhanced data collection, storage and analysis. In this context, privacy laws strain to continue to protect individual rights. This course will place privacy within a social and legal context and will investigate the complex mesh of legal structures and institutions that govern privacy at state, national, and international levels. Students will be taught how to critically analyze privacy problems and make observations about sources of law and their interpretation, with an emphasis on the global nature of data. Students will be provided with the technological details needed to explore information security and management issues in domestic and international contexts. The final grade will be based upon an exam. Students may elect to write a paper (in addition to the exam) for an additional one credit.

Computer Crimes

LAW 721 (1 hour)

Course Description: This course examines the use of modern technology and the Internet to commit crimes, the methods and procedures used to investigate crimes involving computers, and the use of digital evidence in criminal prosecutions. Students will discuss how the phenomenon of the Internet has spurred reexamination of traditional legal concepts in the areas of privacy, search and seizure, criminal liability, and admissibility of evidence. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and a take-home examination.

Digital Discovery and E-Evidence

LAW 719 (1 hour)

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the technology, law, and strategies implicated in the discovery of electronically stored information. More than 90% of all information is now created in electronic form. Recent decisions require attorneys to understand the "document retention architecture" and computer systems of their client's networking system, and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure are being revised to reflect the realities of electronic discovery. The explosion of electronic information has changed the very nature of discovery. These developments create a perfect storm for the judiciary and practicing attorneys, as technology continually creates business efficiencies and complexities for which the law does not always have an answer. Prior computer or technical training is not required, although Evidence is a prerequisite.

National Security & Privacy

LAW 717 (1 hour)

Course Description: National Security and Privacy: The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, began a wide-ranging debate over the extent to which individual privacy must give way to national security and foreign intelligence to provide the Nation with greater protection. This is not the first time, the Nation has crossed this threshold and it is a balancing action that Benjamin Franklin even noted, "they that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." With the invasion of digital technologies and data into our everyday lives and the ease and effectiveness of using these technologies potentially to fight terrorism, new questions and views on the protection of privacy and civil liberties weighed against national security activities must be explored. While shifting to either side of privacy or national security is not the answer, finding the right mix is an important questions. As 9/11 Commission Vice Chairman Lee Hamilton testified before Congress in November 2005, the failure of the national security agencies to understand and to share information about the suspected terrorists "was the single greatest failure of our government in the lead-up to the 9/11 attacks." This course will provide an examination of the legal authorities related to national security law and how the law provides for necessary protections for privacy and civil liberties.

Administrative Law

LAW 621 (3 hours)

This course examines the procedural laws that regulate the activities of administrative agencies. Students will examine the reasons for administrative governance, the tasks handled by administrative agencies, and the roles of lawyers working with and against administrative agencies. Students also will consider the relationships among administrative agencies, the elected branches, and the judiciary.

Internet Law

LAW 664 (3 hours)

Virtually all aspects of business transactions will be affected as they are carried out on-line. This course will provide an overview of the significant legal issues arising as businesses engage in electronic commerce. Topics will include jurisdiction, privacy, electronic contracting, digital signatures, domain names, Internet crimes, trademark and copyright protection, and government regulation of the Internet. The course also will examine the need for uniform laws in this area, as well as recent Federal Legislation and proposed Uniform Acts.

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